Former Raiders fullback Steve Smith dies at age 57 after battling with Lou Gehrig’s disease (ALS)

By | November 22, 2021

Steve Smith – Cause of Death – Steve Smith, 57-year-old, Penn State fullback who played seven seasons with NFL’s Raiders, dies of Lou Gehrig’s disease (ALS). His death was announced by Raiders on Saturday, November 20, 2021. According to sources he was diagnosed with ALS about two decades ago and was unable to walk or talk in recent years. The Las Vegas Raiders are a professional American football team based in the Las Vegas metropolitan area. The Raiders compete in the National Football League as a member club of the league’s American Football Conference West division.

Smith was drafted in the third round by the Raiders in 1987 after starring in college at Penn State, where he helped the Nittany Lions win their last national championship in the 1986 season. He was the lead blocker during his nine-year NFL career for stars like Marcus Allen and Bo Jackson. He also ran for 1,627 yards and nine touchdowns in seven seasons for the Raiders and two in Seattle. He was the lead blocker during his nine-year NFL career for stars like Marcus Allen and Bo Jackson. He also ran for 1,627 yards and nine TDs in seven seasons for the Raiders and two in Seattle. The Raiders announced Smith’s death Saturday, calling him an inspiration for “smiling every day while always working for a cure for” amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The Raiders said their thoughts are with Smith’s widow, Chie, their children, Dante and Jazmin, and their grandson Little Steve.

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as motor neuron disease (MND) or Lou Gehrig’s disease, is a neurodegenerative disease that results in the progressive loss of motor neurons that control voluntary muscles. ALS is the most common type of motor neuron disease. Early symptoms of ALS include stiff muscles, muscle twitches, and gradually increasing weakness and muscle wasting. Limb-onset ALS begins with weakness in the arms or legs, while bulbar-onset ALS begins with difficulty speaking or swallowing. Half of the people with ALS develop at least mild difficulties with thinking and behavior, and about 15% develop frontotemporal dementia. Most people experience pain. The affected muscles are responsible for chewing food, speaking, and walking. Motor neuron loss continues until the ability to eat, speak, move, and finally the ability to breathe is lost. ALS eventually causes paralysis and early death, usually from respiratory failure. Most cases of ALS (about 90% to 95%) have no known cause and are known as sporadic ALS. However, both genetic and environmental factors are believed to be involved. There is no cure for ALS. The goal of treatment is to improve symptoms.

Steve Smith’s obituary will be organized by the family.