Richard Lopez Death – Dead | Dr. Richard Lopez Obituary

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Dr. Richard Lopez Death | Passed Away | Obituary

Richard Lopez Death – Dead: A great loss was made known to InsideEko. As friends and families of the deceased are mourning the passing of their loved and cherished Richard Lopez.

Having heard about this great loss, the family of this individual is passing through pains, mourning the unexpected passing of their beloved.

This departure was confirmed through social media posts made by Twitter users who pour out tributes, and condolences to the family of the deceased.

In Memory of Dr. Richard Lopez • Yesterday I lost not only the greatest piano teacher ever, but a friend. My piano teacher from Otterbein University, Richard Lopez, died due to a cancer, but didn’t die without leaving a LEGACY. I really learned all my jazz from this legend. I helped out until the end, and I am very honored and proud to say that I was a student of his. He is gone, but NEVER FORGOTTEN. Rest in peace, and play some jazz for everyone in heaven

Yesterday was the most difficult day for me, as I lost, but heaven has gained, 2 dear friends of mine. My friend, Dr. Richard Lopez, was my piano partner in crime and dear friend, for more than 20 years. I will truly miss your amazing presence, especially when we made music together. I LOVE YOU! ❤️🙏🎶🎹 Enjoy this performance back in 2010: https://youtu.be/nYNqz4nfJbk

Oh, Lord, please bless this music that it might glorify your Presence. May the talent that you have bestowed upon me be used only to serve You. Let this music be a witness to your majesty and love, and remind us that You are with us in song, and in quiet. May your loving grace and beauty be found in every note,
and may the words that are sung reach our hearts so we will draw closer to You. May Your Spirit guide us through every measure so that
we might be the instruments of your peace, and our music transform our minds, heal our bodies and expand our hearts. Amen.

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of beloved #Otterbein University piano faculty member and senior instructor Dr. Richard Lopez.

Born in Hollywood, CA, of English and Honduran parentage, he spent his early years traveling between England, Central America and the United States. His family eventually settled in Columbus, OH where he completed his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees at The Ohio State University, studying piano with Richard Tetley-Kardos. He moved to New York City, studying with Edith Oppens and Karl Ulrich Schnabel and teaching at two of Manhattan’s Upper West Side music schools, the Bloomingdale House of Music and the Metropolitan Music School. He returned to Columbus to complete his Doctor of Musical Arts Degree, again at OSU, studying with internationally-known pianist Earl Wild. On his return, he established himself as a jazz and classical pianist and teacher in the Central Ohio area, and was a popular performer all over Columbus, especially at the Short North restaurant Rigsby’s. He took a sabbatical year in 2004 to live in Los Angeles where he performed at the Bel-Air Country Club and the Beverly Wilshire Hotel in Beverly Hills.

Richard joined Otterbein’s music department in 1992 and also taught at Denison University, both teaching positions he continued until retiring in May 2020. Richard also taught at the University of Akron, The Ohio State University and Capital University. He was a kind, yet demanding teacher, universally loved by our students and faculty alike. He always sought to deepen his understanding and interpretation of music and he remained passionate about learning and teaching until the end of his life.

Richard was a superb performer, remarkable for his sensitivity and versatility. He presented numerous solo recitals of classical repertoire throughout his career. He also appeared as a soloist with the Columbus Symphony Orchestra and Columbus Jazz Orchestra, the Pro Musica Chamber Orchestra, and the Westerville Symphony among others. His classical playing was characterized by his warm musicianship and exquisite variety of touch.

An imaginative and exciting jazz performer, Richard was Musical Director of the popular “Jazz Masters Series” at the Columbus Museum of Art, where he produced monthly concerts which featured Columbus’s finest jazz players in theme-based and jazz all-star showcase concerts. Richard produced two CD’s: “The Richard Lopez Trio: Live at Rigsby’s”, and “Too Far North”, featuring his original compositions for jazz quartet. He appeared regularly on music festivals, including the Columbus Arts Festival, the Festival Latino, and the Columbus Jazz and Ribfest. He also composed soundtracks for a variety of commercial, educational, corporate and children’s video projects. His original composition, “Blues and Variations” for piano, was commissioned for Capital University’s “Grand Piano Series,” where it received its premiere. He composed and performed an original score for a major exhibition at the Columbus Cultural Arts Center “The Sight of Music”, which explored the intersection and interaction of the aural and visual arts. He was an appropriate choice for this project, since those who were acquainted with him outside of the music community knew him as a talented visual artist who painted locally, in Italy, and in favorite vacation spots Taos, NM and Sanibel, FL. His art is represented on his website: http://www.richardlopezart.com/.

He was an outdoor enthusiast who cycled and hiked thousands of miles in his lifetime, especially during summers in Taos, NM.

He was predeceased by his dear mother, Leila Lopez, and leaves behind his partner of 45 years Steve Dornbusch, his father Virgilio Lopez, his sisters Jane Lopez, Chris Lopez and Ruth Lopez Brown (Bryan), nephews Chris Holbrook (Alex) and Drew Cook (Kana), and niece Sarah Holbrook. He will be sadly missed by his family, friends, students, fellow musicians, and all those who heard him play, but his legacy will live on in their hearts and minds.

In lieu of flowers, the family suggests considering a memorial contribution to the American Cancer Society or an arts organization of their ch

I’m sorry for your loss Pensive face Even when we expect it, it still feels like we didn’t expect it when it happens. Our real educators push us to become the best version we can be. I’m sure Dr. Richard Lopez was proud of the artist you’ve become, that brings profound joy to a teacher.

It is profound the impact educators have on us.
My piano professor at @otterbeinu, Dr. Richard Lopez, has passed away after battling lung cancer.
This hurts. Maybe because I wasn’t expecting it. Maybe because I didn’t reach out to him nearly as often as I thought about him.
I spent many nights running to the music hall after finishing rehearsals around 10pm, and staying there long after the front doors to the building were locked. I was passionate about piano, to be sure, and was working toward a piano minor, but I also knew Dr. Lopez would be disappointed – pissed, frankly – if I wasn’t progressing every week; if I wasn’t investing in my potential. He’d let me know that I was wasting his and my time with his guilt-inducing silent stares.
He was tough. He was challenging. He cared.
My memories of those precious, rare moments when he was deeply moved by my playing are cemented in my heart and mind. I ached for his approval. He was a master at what he did, and I wanted his validation.
I didn’t realize how much my young life as a growing artist was truly affected by this man until I realized I could never again thank him in person.
So this is my Thank You to Dr. Richard Lopez. To a man who made me a much better musician, and a more thoughtful artist. Rest in harmony, sir.

 

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It is profound the impact educators have on us. My piano professor at @otterbeinu, Dr. Richard Lopez, has passed away after battling lung cancer. This hurts. Maybe because I wasn’t expecting it. Maybe because I didn’t reach out to him nearly as often as I thought about him. I spent many nights running to the music hall after finishing rehearsals around 10pm, and staying there long after the front doors to the building were locked. I was passionate about piano, to be sure, and was working toward a piano minor, but I also knew Dr. Lopez would be disappointed – pissed, frankly – if I wasn’t progressing every week; if I wasn’t investing in my potential. He’d let me know that I was wasting his and my time with his guilt-inducing silent stares. He was tough. He was challenging. He cared. My memories of those precious, rare moments when he was deeply moved by my playing are cemented in my heart and mind. I ached for his approval. He was a master at what he did, and I wanted his validation. I didn’t realize how much my young life as a growing artist was truly affected by this man until I realized I could never again thank him in person. So this is my Thank You to Dr. Richard Lopez. To a man who made me a much better musician, and a more thoughtful artist. Rest in harmony, sir.

A post shared by cory michael smith (@corymichaelsmith) on

We are still working on getting more details about the death, as family statement on the death is yet to be released.

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